“Say NO to paying for something that happened 100s of years ago,” screamed one meme that was doing the rounds on social media around the time tabloids began to claim that Caribbean nations were “suing” for reparations. They aren’t, strictly speaking, and nor can something which ended only in 1838 be compared, as it often is, with the Viking invasions or Roman conquest. The CARICOM group of nations, led by Barbados , is really calling for a wider dialogue about historical justice. Why should Britain – or any other former slave-trading nation – shy away from it?

After all, in almost any other sphere, historical continuities are acknowledged, even venerated – aren’t we told ad nauseum that the monarchy is important because it represents continuity? Even something like the “Commonwealth” – whose Games will be held in Glasgow this summer – celebrates the international “links” forged by Britain’s Empire and its apparent historical achievements. Britons are constantly reminded by politicians and some historians to take pride in having “given” former colonies those two old chestnuts, the railways and the English language. Seems a bit odd, if not thoroughly hypocritical, to then swiftly put distance between our “proud” present and the Empire’s rather less flattering legacies, which include gargantuan impoverishment and dislocation across swathes of the globe. How is it possible to keep up the endless national self-congratulation for the abolition of the slave trade while insisting that no one today has any connection to slavery itself?

Priyamvada Gopal for the New Statesman | brilliant piece on reparations 

This past winter was so long that I forgot I’m not naturally curmudgeonly. But spring has finally seesawed its way here, which means rediscovering the world beyond my apartment/winter coat/bed; renegotiating my wardrobe (how to wear this jumpsuit without looking like Rosie of Rosie&Jim?); and the gradual rehabilitation of the facial muscles I use to smile.  I’ve only spent one other spring in New York, and I don’t remember it being this beautiful. Maybe it’s just relief, but these trees (hawthorne? callery pear?) blossoming white flower clouds above our heads make other worlds of these streets. I’m walking around singing with Kelis ”your feet won’t touch the ground, coz there’s no gravity" with nails still wet from the salon because I can’t bear to sit inside a minute longer.  

photos from my ig

hydeordie:

Louise Bourgeois I Had a Flashback of Something that Never Existed, no. 28 of 34, from the fabric illustrated book, Ode à l’oubli. 2002

hydeordie:

Louise Bourgeois I Had a Flashback of Something that Never Existed, no. 28 of 34, from the fabric illustrated book, Ode à l’oubli. 2002

nprmusic:

A new album by R&B’s resident provocateur Kelis is proof she can’t be molded to fit inside one genre.
Stream Food from NPR Music’s First Listen.
Join us for a live Twitter chat using the hashtag #AskKelisNPR, starting today at 4 p.m. ET, with https://twitter.com/nprandb.

nprmusic:

A new album by R&B’s resident provocateur Kelis is proof she can’t be molded to fit inside one genre.

Stream Food from NPR Music’s First Listen.

Join us for a live Twitter chat using the hashtag #AskKelisNPR, starting today at 4 p.m. ET, with https://twitter.com/nprandb.

(via cesaire)

lascasartoris:


Competitors for the Carnival Queen title rehearsing at Holborn Hall, Gray’s Inn Road, London. 
The first Caribbean Carnival  (the precursor to Notting Hill Carnival) was held in St Pancras Town Hall in January 1959.

Contenders for the role of Carnival Queen rehearsing for the first Caribbean Carnival, London, January 1959. Photographer Chris Ware.
Faye Craig was crowned “Carnival Queen” and won a trip to carnival in Trinidad the following year. 
There were 12 contestants, all from the UK’s West Indian community - 6 Jamaicans, 6 Trinidadians, 1 from British Guiana and 1 Vincentian.  From left to right, Fay Craig, Faye Sparkes, Charmain Ourre, Shirley Robinson, June Allison Bailey, Beryl Cunningham, Ronia Richards, Carlita Callymore, Monica Dwyer and Terez Wiggins.
The beauty contest was championed by Claudia Jones, a leading Black political activist, founder and editor of the West Indian Gazette, and ‘Mother of Notting Hill Carnival’. Claudia Jones was also a supporter of beauty and hairdressing salons run by West Indian women and insisted that the West India Gazette carry beauty tips as way to communicate to a female audience the goals of Black self-realisation and valuing Black women’s beauty.
"this was before the Black Power Days. This was well before we all knew that we were beautiful. We might not have know it, but she knew, and she started this beauty contest." - Corinne Skinner Carter

lascasartoris:

Competitors for the Carnival Queen title rehearsing at Holborn Hall, Gray’s Inn Road, London.

The first Caribbean Carnival  (the precursor to Notting Hill Carnival) was held in St Pancras Town Hall in January 1959.

Contenders for the role of Carnival Queen rehearsing for the first Caribbean Carnival, London, January 1959. Photographer Chris Ware.

Faye Craig was crowned “Carnival Queen” and won a trip to carnival in Trinidad the following year. 

There were 12 contestants, all from the UK’s West Indian community - 6 Jamaicans, 6 Trinidadians, 1 from British Guiana and 1 Vincentian.  From left to right, Fay Craig, Faye Sparkes, Charmain Ourre, Shirley Robinson, June Allison Bailey, Beryl Cunningham, Ronia Richards, Carlita Callymore, Monica Dwyer and Terez Wiggins.

The beauty contest was championed by Claudia Jones, a leading Black political activist, founder and editor of the West Indian Gazette, and ‘Mother of Notting Hill Carnival’. Claudia Jones was also a supporter of beauty and hairdressing salons run by West Indian women and insisted that the West India Gazette carry beauty tips as way to communicate to a female audience the goals of Black self-realisation and valuing Black women’s beauty.

"this was before the Black Power Days. This was well before we all knew that we were beautiful. We might not have know it, but she knew, and she started this beauty contest." - Corinne Skinner Carter

(Source: spiritsdancinginthenight, via toblackgirls)

lostinurbanism:

Regina Monfort

lostinurbanism:

Regina Monfort

(via xaymacans)

certifiedshawty:

Joanna Russ, Across the Wounded Galaxies: Interviews with Contemporary American Science Fiction Writers

certifiedshawty:

Joanna Russ, Across the Wounded Galaxies: Interviews with Contemporary American Science Fiction Writers

(via cesaire)

brotherfromadiffrentworld:

I was at this. Great film event and chat afterwards!

derica:

THE FUTURE WEIRD: remote control
Wednesday 26th MARCH 2014 @8PM, Spectacle Theater 

The Future Weird is back with REMOTE CONTROL, an evening of films concerning witches & bitches – women who see, take, and sell things they cannot grasp. Whether they wield powers to possess, or are somehow controlled, the technologies these films document are deployed without regard for reciprocity or consent. 

REMOTE CONTROL is both the loss of individual agency, and the thrilling ability to inhabit another’s body. Presenting weird clips alongside shorts by Zina Saro Wiwa, Elaine Castillo, Fyzal Boulifa, and the U.S. Premiere of TOUCH by Shola Amoo, we’re talking possession, surveillance, “brain to brain interface”, and the sinister compulsion to repurpose the humanoid. Join us on Wednesday 26th March @8PM as we contemplate the human of use of human beings.

More details & RSVP via the Facebook event page 

The Future Weird is a screening series dedicated to sci-fi/experimental/weird film by black, African & Third World directors created by Derica Shields & Megan Eardley. Find details of previous programs and follow us here & here

Woop! Thanks for coming Curtis! Was lovely to meet you. 


Phiney Pet AW14 - ‘The Deptford Wives’
Photographer - Agnes Kotwinska
Styling - Kyanisha Morgan
Hair/Make-Up - Scarlett Burton
Model - Elisabeth Clarke 

Phiney Pet AW14 - ‘The Deptford Wives’

Photographer - Agnes Kotwinska

Styling - Kyanisha Morgan

Hair/Make-Up - Scarlett Burton

Model - Elisabeth Clarke 

(Source: phineypet, via unimpressed2chainz)

THE FUTURE WEIRD: remote control
Wednesday 26th MARCH 2014 @8PM, Spectacle Theater 

The Future Weird is back with REMOTE CONTROL, an evening of films concerning witches & bitches – women who see, take, and sell things they cannot grasp. Whether they wield powers to possess, or are somehow controlled, the technologies these films document are deployed without regard for reciprocity or consent. 

REMOTE CONTROL is both the loss of individual agency, and the thrilling ability to inhabit another’s body. Presenting weird clips alongside shorts by Zina Saro Wiwa, Elaine Castillo, Fyzal Boulifa, and the U.S. Premiere of TOUCH by Shola Amoo, we’re talking possession, surveillance, “brain to brain interface”, and the sinister compulsion to repurpose the humanoid. Join us on Wednesday 26th March @8PM as we contemplate the human of use of human beings.

More details & RSVP via the Facebook event page 

The Future Weird is a screening series dedicated to sci-fi/experimental/weird film by black, African & Third World directors created by Derica Shields & Megan Eardley. Find details of previous programs and follow us here & here

tillahwillah:

Martin Carter could have written this yesterday. #caribbean #poet #martincarter #guyana #worldpoetryday

tillahwillah:

Martin Carter could have written this yesterday. #caribbean #poet #martincarter #guyana #worldpoetryday

I’ve been thinking too much. If the president isn’t willing to even say the words “black love” or “white supremacy” or “patriarchy,” he can be a black boy’s keeper, but he can’t be an honest lover of black boys. They’re trying to fix black boys on the cheap, without reckoning with white supremacy. You fix a “what.” You don’t fix a “whom.” What really needs fixing? It’s dishonest and violent to focus on black boys when black girls are catching hell from everything under the sun, and catching hell from black boys and black men. Don’t get me started. I get the restraints Obama is under. I get that his job is to lie to a nation of liars. But don’t bring black boys up on stage and lie to them in front of the world. In front of Bill O’Reilly? I hate when folks use us as props. And then they had the little brothers dressed in the same outfits. It was so shameful. I’m wondering, do you think the nation or our state has ever, or will ever, loudly and lovingly focus on the lives of black girls and black women?

Hey Mama by Kiese Laymon - Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics (via guernicamag)

(via basedandbiased)

boy you know what I’m about / don’t need no one to save me - Kelela on “Melba’s Call”

boy you know what I’m about / don’t need no one to save me - Kelela on “Melba’s Call”

thefutureweird:

The Future Weird now has a dedicated facebook page. Get updates there & look out for forthcoming screenings in March 2014
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thefutureweird

thefutureweird:

The Future Weird now has a dedicated facebook page. Get updates there & look out for forthcoming screenings in March 2014

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/thefutureweird