Install Theme
dc-via-chicago:


How to Suffer Politely (And Other Etiquette for the Lumpenproletariat), (Deep Matte Polio Digital C-Print, 2014) A series of aphoristic posters that explore the intersections of the (performance of) suffering with respectability politics. How are poor people policed to suffer in ways that do not disturb/make uncomfortable oppressive institutions or communities? How have poor people been asked to engage in impossible feats of optimism and perseverance in the face of monotonous cycles of poverty and a free market that leaves very few free? How is this suffering declawed of its indictment of oppressive legacies, systems and institutions through narrative framing both in mainstream journalism and other forms of popular media? What is the hidden labor associated with being a poor person who performs tenacity and superhero feats by either smiling through the pain of living paycheck to paycheck or working harder? This ongoing series of aphoristic texts explores capitalist messaging as well as the pedagogy of capitalism.

© Kameelah Janan Rasheed, 2014

dc-via-chicago:

How to Suffer Politely (And Other Etiquette for the Lumpenproletariat), (Deep Matte Polio Digital C-Print, 2014) A series of aphoristic posters that explore the intersections of the (performance of) suffering with respectability politics. How are poor people policed to suffer in ways that do not disturb/make uncomfortable oppressive institutions or communities? How have poor people been asked to engage in impossible feats of optimism and perseverance in the face of monotonous cycles of poverty and a free market that leaves very few free? How is this suffering declawed of its indictment of oppressive legacies, systems and institutions through narrative framing both in mainstream journalism and other forms of popular media? What is the hidden labor associated with being a poor person who performs tenacity and superhero feats by either smiling through the pain of living paycheck to paycheck or working harder? This ongoing series of aphoristic texts explores capitalist messaging as well as the pedagogy of capitalism.

© Kameelah Janan Rasheed, 2014

(via curmudgeoning)

humansofnewyork:

“I wanted to be a defense lawyer because I wanted to come back and protect my community. I wanted to protect my people from the police. People around here grow up hating the police. But you know what they’ve done? The police have recruited our people. They’ve made it more complicated. They’ve got Dominicans and Puerto Ricans doing their work for them. Because they know it’s hard to hate your people. But as soon as that badge goes on, it changes you. Once that badge goes on, your people are the ‘boys in blue.’”

humansofnewyork:

“I wanted to be a defense lawyer because I wanted to come back and protect my community. I wanted to protect my people from the police. People around here grow up hating the police. But you know what they’ve done? The police have recruited our people. They’ve made it more complicated. They’ve got Dominicans and Puerto Ricans doing their work for them. Because they know it’s hard to hate your people. But as soon as that badge goes on, it changes you. Once that badge goes on, your people are the ‘boys in blue.’”

(via curmudgeoning)

rhomeporium:

A mother’s worst nightmare.

uzowuru:

here’s some music i’ve made that i really wanted to share with you guys. more is on the way, i hope you guys like it.

derica:

I’m presenting THE FUTURE WEIRD: Remote Control at the Museum of Arts and Design Saturday 9 August 2014, @3PM & I’m vv excited about it!
Remote Control is four experimental/sci-fi films by four artists, all dealing with women negotiating patriarchy and its discontents. 
The films are set in, or draw material from, a range of geographies and cultural experiences (Nigeria/Philippines/UK/Morocco), and we’re attentive to the differences between the films and how they stand alone. Zina Saro Wiwa’s film for instance, takes on “the unforgiving treatment of single women” in Nigeria and Nollywood specifically. There are also ideas which speak to the present, despite being set in a dystopian future. In one short, a white woman experiences sexual pleasure/liberation using a black woman as her real-world avatar (hello Miley Cyrus / Lily Allen / Iggy Azalea)
There are prevailing themes: patriarchy and desire; the fraught relationship between a woman’s freedom and social convention; and the horrifying circularity of gendered power dynamics. The screening is followed by discussion — not a Q&A — there are no experts at The Future Weird.
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thefutureweird:

R S V P


Today!

derica:

I’m presenting THE FUTURE WEIRD: Remote Control at the Museum of Arts and Design Saturday 9 August 2014, @3PM & I’m vv excited about it!

Remote Control is four experimental/sci-fi films by four artists, all dealing with women negotiating patriarchy and its discontents. 

The films are set in, or draw material from, a range of geographies and cultural experiences (Nigeria/Philippines/UK/Morocco), and we’re attentive to the differences between the films and how they stand alone. Zina Saro Wiwa’s film for instance, takes on “the unforgiving treatment of single women” in Nigeria and Nollywood specifically. There are also ideas which speak to the present, despite being set in a dystopian future. In one short, a white woman experiences sexual pleasure/liberation using a black woman as her real-world avatar (hello Miley Cyrus / Lily Allen / Iggy Azalea)

There are prevailing themes: patriarchy and desire; the fraught relationship between a woman’s freedom and social convention; and the horrifying circularity of gendered power dynamics. The screening is followed by discussion — not a Q&A — there are no experts at The Future Weird.

Facebook | Tumblr | Twitter

thefutureweird:

R S V P

Today!

thefutureweird:

LUPITA ON WANGECHI | by Zina Saro Wiwa

Back in 2010, as part of her project “This is My Africa”, Zina Saro Wiwa interviewed Lupita Nyong’o about her love for the work of Wangechi Mutu.

"She creates these new bodies, they’re very elegant, very loud and sensual at the same time, really primitive and yet futuristic […] In Africa there’s all this talk about tension between tradition and modernity, but when these two clash, so many other things come out. And that’s what I feel Wangechi captures, that complexity, that new identity that comes out of an Africa that’s flexing it’s muscles and trying to find its place. - Lupita on Wangechi

I’m presenting THE FUTURE WEIRD: Remote Control at the Museum of Arts and Design Saturday 9 August 2014, @3PM & I’m vv excited about it!
Remote Control is four experimental/sci-fi films by four artists, all dealing with women negotiating patriarchy and its discontents. 
The films are set in, or draw material from, a range of geographies and cultural experiences (Nigeria/Philippines/UK/Morocco), and we’re attentive to the differences between the films and how they stand alone. Zina Saro Wiwa’s film for instance, takes on “the unforgiving treatment of single women” in Nigeria and Nollywood specifically. There are also ideas which speak to the present, despite being set in a dystopian future. In one short, a white woman experiences sexual pleasure/liberation using a black woman as her real-world avatar (hello Miley Cyrus / Lily Allen / Iggy Azalea)
There are prevailing themes: patriarchy and desire; the fraught relationship between a woman’s freedom and social convention; and the horrifying circularity of gendered power dynamics. The screening is followed by discussion — not a Q&A — there are no experts at The Future Weird.
Facebook | Tumblr | Twitter
thefutureweird:

R S V P

I’m presenting THE FUTURE WEIRD: Remote Control at the Museum of Arts and Design Saturday 9 August 2014, @3PM & I’m vv excited about it!

Remote Control is four experimental/sci-fi films by four artists, all dealing with women negotiating patriarchy and its discontents. 

The films are set in, or draw material from, a range of geographies and cultural experiences (Nigeria/Philippines/UK/Morocco), and we’re attentive to the differences between the films and how they stand alone. Zina Saro Wiwa’s film for instance, takes on “the unforgiving treatment of single women” in Nigeria and Nollywood specifically. There are also ideas which speak to the present, despite being set in a dystopian future. In one short, a white woman experiences sexual pleasure/liberation using a black woman as her real-world avatar (hello Miley Cyrus / Lily Allen / Iggy Azalea)

There are prevailing themes: patriarchy and desire; the fraught relationship between a woman’s freedom and social convention; and the horrifying circularity of gendered power dynamics. The screening is followed by discussion — not a Q&A — there are no experts at The Future Weird.

Facebook | Tumblr | Twitter

thefutureweird:

R S V P

gap-teeth said: one of the endless reasons i would like to be in nyc right now

where are you based? I’m determined to travel the future weird programs so email thefutureweird@gmail.com if you have ideas for where we could screen near you 

We’re screening THE FUTURE WEIRD: Remote Control at the Museum of Arts and Design Saturday 9 August 2014, @3PM & I’m vv excited about it!
Remote Control is four sci-fi/experimental films by four black & brown artists that deal with women negotiating patriarchy and its discontents. 
The films are set in, or draw material from, a range of geographies and cultural experiences - Nigeria / Philippines / UK / Morocco, and we’re alert to the cultural specificities. For instance, Zina Saro Wiwa’s film addresses “the unforgiving treatment of single women” in Nigeria and Nollywood specifically. There are also themes that prevail across the films: patriarchy & desire; the fraught relationship between a woman’s freedom & social convention;  the horrifying circularity of gendered power dynamics.
These images come to us from dystopian futures and/or via humanoids, androids and psychic vampires, but always telling us something about our present. In Shola Amoo’s film, a white woman experiences sexual liberation by using a black woman as her real-world avatar — why, hello Miley Cyrus / Lily Allen / Iggy Azalea!
Our screenings are always followed by lively, hype, fun discussion — not a Q&A — because there are no experts at The Future Weird, so come talk with us.
R S V P \ Facebook \ Tumblr \ Twitter 

We’re screening THE FUTURE WEIRD: Remote Control at the Museum of Arts and Design Saturday 9 August 2014, @3PM & I’m vv excited about it!

Remote Control is four sci-fi/experimental films by four black & brown artists that deal with women negotiating patriarchy and its discontents. 

The films are set in, or draw material from, a range of geographies and cultural experiences - Nigeria / Philippines / UK / Morocco, and we’re alert to the cultural specificities. For instance, Zina Saro Wiwa’s film addresses “the unforgiving treatment of single women” in Nigeria and Nollywood specifically. There are also themes that prevail across the films: patriarchy & desire; the fraught relationship between a woman’s freedom & social convention;  the horrifying circularity of gendered power dynamics.

These images come to us from dystopian futures and/or via humanoids, androids and psychic vampires, but always telling us something about our present. In Shola Amoo’s film, a white woman experiences sexual liberation by using a black woman as her real-world avatar — why, hello Miley Cyrus / Lily Allen / Iggy Azalea!

Our screenings are always followed by lively, hype, fun discussion — not a Q&A — because there are no experts at The Future Weird, so come talk with us.

R S V P \ Facebook \ Tumblr \ Twitter 

manufactoriel:

London (1960-1970), by Al Vandenberg

manufactoriel:

London (1960-1970), by Al Vandenberg

Opening Ceremony Blog: A London Art Collective Takes On The Brooklyn Beauty Parlor →

westindians:

uslonelylondoners:

Kareem, who finished his university film degree last year, met fellow Lonely Londoner Rianna, a writer and feminist activist, and Pelin, a foodie who studied international development, the way lots of artists do today: on Tumblr. All in their early twenties and the children of first- or second-generation immigrants, the three finally met in person at a meditation class after following each other’s accounts for years. Since, the collective––which actually prefers the label “art house” in tribute to ballroom culture’s houses––has organized film screenings, group shows, and performance pieces on topics like the racial experience of albino families in Puerto Rico and rising unemployment among UK youth. Queenies, Fades, and Blunts was their first project in NYC, and next month, they’ll be turning it into a zine.

In an age when it seems like every 20-something artist is part of A COLLECTIVE, it’s refreshing to find one based not only on aesthetic similarities but shared political goals. “Our work is based on real aspects of culture and trying to make things as unpretentious as possible,” said Kareem. “We all need to get our hair cut. We all need to get our nails done. Everybody wants to look pretty––everybody can relate to that.”

got interviewed for a feature for Opening Ceremony! <3 

<3

On Saturday 9th August at 3PM, THE FUTURE WEIRD presents REMOTE CONTROL at the Museum of Arts and Design’s MAD Biennale, in association with Spectacle Theater
REMOTE CONTROL is a program of short films concerning witches & bitches – women who see, take, and sell things they cannot grasp. Whether they wield powers to possess, or are somehow controlled, the technologies these films document are deployed without regard for reciprocity or consent. 
Presenting shorts by Zina Saro WiwaFyzal Boulifa and Shola Amoo, we’re talking possession, surveillance, “brain to brain interface”, and the human use of human beings. 
THE FUTURE WEIRD is a screening series dedicated to speculative, experimental and weird film by directors from Africa and the Global South. 
WHEREMuseum of Arts and Design, 2 Columbus Circle
WHEN: Saturday 9th August 2014 @3PM
TIX: $10/$5 concessions

by / Nakeya Janice Brown

by / Nakeya Janice Brown

(Source: nakeyab)

nakeyab:

The pot is a tool in which we cook and curl. Domestic duties and beauty rituals converge into a shared time and space.
image