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It’s almost August, so here are some things from June.

The beach on my birthday & birthday flowers. The Lonely Londoners & friends spend time in my apartment asking me questions, and bringing me joy like Anita Baker. Time in Baltimore and DC with friends who teach me again and again to really commit to living. And the essay and talk that resulted from Hannah Black forcing me to write about my Queen Elizabeth I wallet. 


Queenies, Fades, & Blunts is an pop-up QTPOC beauty space curated by The Lonely Londoners featuring original works from Mojuicy (Mohammed Fayaz), Quilombo (Bryan Rodriguez), and Kareem Reid & Khaleb Brooks.
Curating a production of film and artwork from these local artists of color, The Lonely Londoners invite you to indulge in these abstract ideas of un/safe cultural spaces, herstories, hair stories, beautification and how these processes are experienced socially, culturally and politically. Submissions for a following zine are now open for print and online publication in August, which you can find here.
We want to see you all there. Join us for an early evening of refreshments & the sweetest vibes followed by papijuice​ Volume 14 at One Last Shag, with guest DJs Beto and Ushka of iBomba.
Click attending on Facebook. 

Queenies, Fades, & Blunts is an pop-up QTPOC beauty space curated by The Lonely Londoners featuring original works from Mojuicy (Mohammed Fayaz), Quilombo (Bryan Rodriguez), and Kareem Reid & Khaleb Brooks.

Curating a production of film and artwork from these local artists of color, The Lonely Londoners invite you to indulge in these abstract ideas of un/safe cultural spaces, herstories, hair stories, beautification and how these processes are experienced socially, culturally and politically. Submissions for a following zine are now open for print and online publication in August, which you can find here.

We want to see you all there. Join us for an early evening of refreshments & the sweetest vibes followed by papijuice​ Volume 14 at One Last Shag, with guest DJs Beto and Ushka of iBomba.

Click attending on Facebook

Civil society has become so anti-politics, because of course politics is so evil, so toxic. But politics is what you do to make the world better, not “spreading awareness to communities”. It’s in the political that these things happen. The utter cynicism of it [aid/development] is that there’s no politics in Africa so you simply bypass it.

Binyavanga Wainaina | “On Aid, Power and the Politics of Development" The Guardian

asiawerbel:

backstage fashionscoutlondon ss14 ©AsiaWerbel2013

asiawerbel:

backstage fashionscoutlondon ss14 ©AsiaWerbel2013


Interviewer: One could say for the American negro to achieve the middle class white American standard is a revolution.
Grace Lee Boggs: I don’t think that whites understand the degree to which negroes do not want their whiteness. I’m trying to suggest that the negro is striving to become equal to a particular image of himself that he has achieved. That he is not trying to become equal to whites.


from “American Revolutionary" a documentary about Grace Lee Boggs, available to watch online here until July 30th 2014

Interviewer: One could say for the American negro to achieve the middle class white American standard is a revolution.

Grace Lee Boggs: I don’t think that whites understand the degree to which negroes do not want their whiteness. I’m trying to suggest that the negro is striving to become equal to a particular image of himself that he has achieved. That he is not trying to become equal to whites.

fromAmerican Revolutionary" a documentary about Grace Lee Boggs, available to watch online here until July 30th 2014

Painter painting in our land pictures of only white angels
Painter painting in our time in shadows of yesterday

Painter, if you paint with love, paint me some black angels now
For all good blacks in heaven, painter show us that you care

Eartha Kitt - Angelitos Negros (1970 performance)

(Source: foxwin, via xanku)

I went as this picture of Grace Jones to a party once. My approximation was unsuccessful.

I went as this picture of Grace Jones to a party once. My approximation was unsuccessful.

This is why you shouldn’t keep old friends #cyberbullying @a_shotinthedark

This is why you shouldn’t keep old friends #cyberbullying @a_shotinthedark

Bonjay

—Jamelia (Caribou cover)

Domestic Violence and Two-Parent Households - The New York Times →

AFTER spending two years studying services for domestic violence survivors, I was surprised to realize that one of the most common barriers to women’s safety was something I had never considered before: the high value our culture places on two-parent families.

I began my research in 2011, the year the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that more than one-third of American women are assaulted by an intimate partner during their lives. I talked to women in communities that ranged from a small rural mining town to a large global city, in police stations, criminal courts, emergency shelters, job placement centers and custody proceedings. I found that almost all of the women with children I interviewed had maintained contact with their abusers. Why?

Many had internalized a public narrative that equated marriage with success. Women experiencing domestic abuse are told by our culture that being a good mother means marrying the father of her children and supporting a relationship between them. According to a 2010 Pew report, 69 percent of Americans say single mothers without male partners to help raise their children are bad for society, and 61 percent agree that a child needs a mother and a father to grow up happily.

The awareness of the stigma of single motherhood became apparent to me when I met a young woman who was seven months pregnant. She had recently left her abusive boyfriend and was living in a domestic violence shelter. When I asked if she thought the relationship was over, she responded, “As far as being together right now, I don’t want to be together. But I do hope that in the future — because my mind puts it out there like, O.K., I don’t want to be a statistic.” When she said this, I assumed she was referring to domestic violence statistics. But she continued: “I don’t want to be this young pregnant mom who they say never lasts with the baby’s father. I don’t want to be like that.”

Shame about not meeting certain standards of motherhood was prevalent in upper-middle-class families, too. Women with professional and social prominence often feared tarnishing the veneer of their perfect-looking lives. Others were afraid of being judged for putting their children at risk by choosing a dangerous partner. One explained that she kept her abuse a secret because “I was embarrassed by the things I was seeing; I couldn’t let people know that he wasn’t the husband and provider we pretended he was.” Regardless of who they were, most survivors were acutely aware of how their victimization would influence their public identities as mothers.

The truly alarming part, however, is the extent to which the institutions that are intended to assist domestic violence survivors — protection order courts, mental health services, public benefits programs and child custody systems — reinforce this stigma with both official policies and ingrained prejudices.

Mental health professionals, law enforcement officials, judges and members of the clergy often showed greater concern for the maintenance of a two-parent family than for the safety of the mother and her children. Women who left abusive men were frequently perceived at best as mothers who had not successfully kept their children out of harm’s way and at worst as liars who were alienating children from their fathers.

In court, I watched a judge order the very first woman I interviewed to drop off her son at his father’s house every week for visitation. When she tried to tell the judge that she had a protection order against her child’s father and that she was concerned for her safety, the judge responded: “You know what? You are just trying to keep this child from his father, aren’t you?”

I saw women lose custody rights because they had moved with their children to friends’ houses or even into domestic violence shelters to escape abuse, and judges considered these “unsuitable living arrangements.” The children were sent back to their abusive fathers, who could provide “more stability.”

Another survivor I spoke with was tangled in a custody battle with her former boyfriend, who was also being prosecuted in criminal court for injuring their children. One afternoon, we sat outside the town’s courthouse. She had just lost two additional days a week of custody to the children’s father. The primary evidence against her was a picture of her drinking a cocktail, illustrating her apparent unsuitability as a mother. She said: “I tried to get my kids out before things got really bad, and the court was like, ‘Where are the bruises? It’s not so bad. Why are you alienating the kids from Dad?’ Next time they said, ‘Why didn’t you get out? Why didn’t you protect the kids?’ They want you to get away from the abuse and then they make it so hard.”

The very system meant to punish perpetrators and protect survivors of violence bound the two more tightly together. This reality deeply affected women’s choices; many calculated that they would rather live in abusive homes with their children than risk leaving them alone.

Since returning from my fieldwork, I have been struck by the pervasive narrative across the ideological spectrum regarding the value of two-parent families. To be sure, children who enjoy the support of two adults fare better on average than those who do not, and parents with loving partners often benefit from greater emotional and economic security. However, I have seen the ways in which prioritizing two-parent families tethers victims of violence to their assailants, sacrifices safety in the name of parental rights and helps batterers maintain control. Sweeping rhetoric about the value of marriage and father involvement is not just incomplete. For victims of domestic violence, it’s dangerous.

(Source: ethiopienne)

cecileemeke:

Ackee & Saltfish Trailer - Cecile Emeke

Meet the hilarious bestfriends that are Rachel and Olivia in the trailer for the upcoming short, Ackee & Saltfish.

http://ackeeandsaltfish.co.uk

http://vimeo.com/cecileemeke/ackeeandsaltfishtrailer

Truly love this. Emeke captures how intimacy can be expressed through backchat, shit-talk and a perfectly-timed, quick-witted cuss. So glad to see this dynamic onscreen; it makes me miss my sister.

(via xaymacans)

Yet, one cannot avoid wondering about the limitations of the idea of a black radical tradition. Perhaps there are ways it is insufficient in the face of the wide-ranging demands of black life. Perhaps it is not enough. Perhaps it never will be. Perhaps it was never meant to be enough. Here, the image of a broken bridge comes to mind—something that I was trying to come to terms with during the roundtable when I used the notion of a “queer pier” to suggest that the idea of a black radical tradition might simply serve as an occasion for congregating at the limits of possibility, as if it was a platform for innovation or a workshop that gestures toward an unknown horizon or some destination on the other side; and although the prospects of arrival are slim, the reach provides a kind of refuge and a place to momentarily escape.
lostinurbanism:

Ian Berry, South London. School Kids (1964)

lostinurbanism:

Ian Berry, South London. School Kids (1964)