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uslonelylondoners:

QUEENIES FADES & BLUNTS. BROOKLYN. SUMMER 2014.

We’re moving to NYC for the summer and our family is growing.

QFB* is a multi-platform project focused on queering barbershops, hair salons and other beauty spaces. This project will address the abstract ideas of beautification and how that process is experienced socially, culturally and politically. 

This is a collaborative effort between The Lonely Londoners, Quilombo, Mo Juicy, Papi Juice, Elvin Tavarez and Khaleb Brooks. Born out of our desire to participate in an international exchange between POC creatives/artists. We were lucky to connect with others who are progressive and inclusive culture producers. By sharing our understandings and ideas an organic partnership was formed.

submissions, requests and ideas are open to all!

email lonelylondoners@gmail.com

tionam:

hair was always laid and them pearls on deck.

RIP to the great Dr. Maya Angelou

(Source: christel-thoughts, via basedandbiased)

ushistoryminuswhiteguys:

Lucy Hicks Anderson was a pioneer in the fight for marriage equality. She spent nearly sixty years living as a woman, doing domestic work, and working as a madam. During the last decade of her life, she made history by fighting for the legal right to be herself with the man she loved.

After marrying her second husband, soldier Reuben Anderson, in Oxnard, California, in 1944, local authorities discovered that she was assigned male at birth. The couple was charged with perjury for marrying despite their both being legally male, resulting in ten years of probation. Standing up to the charges against her, Anderson said, “I defy any doctor in the world to prove that I am not a woman. I have lived, dressed, acted just what I am, a woman.” Years later, Anderson and her husband were charged again, this time with fraud after she received federal money reserved for military spouses. Both went to prison and were banned from Oxnard upon their release.

Lucy Hicks Anderson spent the remainder of her life in Los Angeles until her death in 1954, at age 68, leaving behind a legacy of authenticity and determination in the face of unjust laws.


5 Black Trans Women who Paved the Way — Massachusetts Transgender Political Coalition

(via howtobeafuckinglady)

tobia:

If you haven’t seen it, this marks the final week to view #BLACKEYE at 57 Walker Street in TriBeCa, NYC, which ends May 24th. Hope you all can make it out to see this extraordinary show. (www.blackeyeart.com)

tobia:

If you haven’t seen it, this marks the final week to view #BLACKEYE at 57 Walker Street in TriBeCa, NYC, which ends May 24th. Hope you all can make it out to see this extraordinary show. (www.blackeyeart.com)

(via crankyskirt)

thefutureweird:

THE FUTURE WEIRD: (non-)resident aliens

On Wednesday 21st May, The Future Weird returns with [NON-]RESIDENT ALIENS, an evening of short films about migration, borders, gentrification and contested space. Remembering so-called “black sites”– where government projects are conducted outside of a country’s territory – and isolated immigrant detention centers, we invite you to consider the kind of landscapes we protect, the people we eliminate, and the shocking logic of labour without bodies.

NON-RESIDENT ALIENS presents curated clips & shorts,photography by Richard Mosse & Ingrid Pollard and a dystopic coming-of-age Brazilian TV drama set in a starkly unequal future. 

Join us on Wednesday 21st May 2014 @8PM, at Spectacle Theater for the fifth edition of The Future Weird

» RSVP «

I interviewed Biyi Bandele, director of the Half of a Yellow Sun movie.
We spent two hours speaking about the choices he made as he was adapting, casting and shooting HOAYS, and more broadly about film, representation and industry gatekeepers. I have some criticisms of the film (which I include in the piece) but I wanted to post this quote which I eventually omitted from the interview, in which Bandele eloquently describes the alienation and horror of watching white directors’ representations of Africans:

"I mean, one of the things that inspired me to make movies was this experience that happened over and over. We’d watch movies made about Africans and want to crawl under the seat because you felt dehumanised, you felt disrespected, you felt silenced, you felt muted, you felt disenfranchised, because someone who really didn’t see you as a human being seemed to be the only person who was allowed to tell your story, and if you tried to tell it yourself they tried to shoot you down. It’s precisely because of people like that that I decided we need to tell our own stories, we really need to." 

I interviewed Biyi Bandele, director of the Half of a Yellow Sun movie.

We spent two hours speaking about the choices he made as he was adapting, casting and shooting HOAYS, and more broadly about film, representation and industry gatekeepers. I have some criticisms of the film (which I include in the piece) but I wanted to post this quote which I eventually omitted from the interview, in which Bandele eloquently describes the alienation and horror of watching white directors’ representations of Africans:

"I mean, one of the things that inspired me to make movies was this experience that happened over and over. We’d watch movies made about Africans and want to crawl under the seat because you felt dehumanised, you felt disrespected, you felt silenced, you felt muted, you felt disenfranchised, because someone who really didn’t see you as a human being seemed to be the only person who was allowed to tell your story, and if you tried to tell it yourself they tried to shoot you down. It’s precisely because of people like that that I decided we need to tell our own stories, we really need to." 

qualr:

Juliana Huxtable brings us yet another voguetastic mix starring Nicki Minaj, LE1F and others. If you don’t know about Juliana Huxtable, this will be a great introduction for you to get informed on Her Majesty.

Qualr rates the mix 10/10.

afrocentrico:

prayer by hammond robin

afrocentrico:

prayer by hammond robin

(via lagosphotos)

PROUD FLESH INTER/VIEWS: SYLVIA WYNTER →

derica:

And then more and more, examining myself, examining in my own instinctive reactions to value and so on, there is no way in which I can avoid the fact that I am born into a world in which everything Black has been negatively marked; and everything white has been positively marked. Although I can re-think myself, there are reflex valuations that I continually carry. I suddenly began to see what DuBois was trying to get at and what Fanon was going to get at with Black “self-alienation,” which is that “I have a consciousness that does not function for my best interest!” THERE HAS TO BE A WAR AGAINST “CONSCIOUSNESS.” BLACK STUDIES WAS A WAR! Against what Larry Neal called “the white thing within us”

- in “The Black Arts Movement,” from Addison Gayle, Jr.’s The Black Aesthetic (1971)

(Source: hystericalblackness:)

ohgeography:

I swear I’ll stop writing about my life as a sad black teenage dirtbag as soon as I stop being a sad black teenage dirtbag. Lately it just feels really important for me to share my sadness with you as a black woman and to add my words to canon of other woc who are struggling but find security in writing.
Here’s a thing I wrote on This Recording today in which I use my bathtub as a vehicle of time travel as well as a means of absolution. 
Click thru to read.

ohgeography:

I swear I’ll stop writing about my life as a sad black teenage dirtbag as soon as I stop being a sad black teenage dirtbag. Lately it just feels really important for me to share my sadness with you as a black woman and to add my words to canon of other woc who are struggling but find security in writing.

Here’s a thing I wrote on This Recording today in which I use my bathtub as a vehicle of time travel as well as a means of absolution.

Click thru to read.

(via cesaire)

bienenkiste:

Maddie Seisay by Lucia McCarthy

bienenkiste:

Maddie Seisay by Lucia McCarthy

(via kra-end)

howtogetawaywithmurderabc:

From the creator of Scandal and Grey’s Anatomy comes America’s next obsession, How To Get Away With Murder staring Viola Davis – take a first look now.

(via crankyskirt)

Billie Holiday x Hazel Scott at a private party, 1957
I realise seeing this picture that I rarely think of Billie with women. I should read a biography because, fuelled by her music, I tend to imagine her as either powerfully solitary [good morning heartache or travelin’ all alone]or surrounded by men - band members or maybe the spectral men of her torch songs. As far as friendships go, maybe I think of her exchanging speaking looks with Lester Young during their miraculous 1957 performance. But imagine the conversations she had with wonderful Hazel Scott. Did they exchange advice? Did they talk shit about the music industry and the men’s big egos? It’s good to think of Billie laughing with girlfriends, it shades in the fierce and tragic figure that is the popular imagination of her. 
(via fuckyeahbillieholiday:)

Billie Holiday x Hazel Scott at a private party, 1957

I realise seeing this picture that I rarely think of Billie with women. I should read a biography because, fuelled by her music, I tend to imagine her as either powerfully solitary [good morning heartache or travelin’ all alone]or surrounded by men - band members or maybe the spectral men of her torch songs. As far as friendships go, maybe I think of her exchanging speaking looks with Lester Young during their miraculous 1957 performance. But imagine the conversations she had with wonderful Hazel Scott. Did they exchange advice? Did they talk shit about the music industry and the men’s big egos? It’s good to think of Billie laughing with girlfriends, it shades in the fierce and tragic figure that is the popular imagination of her. 

(via fuckyeahbillieholiday:)

(Source: billiesholiday, via billiesbluesday-deactivated2012)