Install Theme
Yet, one cannot avoid wondering about the limitations of the idea of a black radical tradition. Perhaps there are ways it is insufficient in the face of the wide-ranging demands of black life. Perhaps it is not enough. Perhaps it never will be. Perhaps it was never meant to be enough. Here, the image of a broken bridge comes to mind—something that I was trying to come to terms with during the roundtable when I used the notion of a “queer pier” to suggest that the idea of a black radical tradition might simply serve as an occasion for congregating at the limits of possibility, as if it was a platform for innovation or a workshop that gestures toward an unknown horizon or some destination on the other side; and although the prospects of arrival are slim, the reach provides a kind of refuge and a place to momentarily escape.
lostinurbanism:

Ian Berry, South London. School Kids (1964)

lostinurbanism:

Ian Berry, South London. School Kids (1964)

SALMA YAQOOB confronts Conservative MP Iain Duncan Smith on poverty, austerity & and the government’s labelling of those on benefits as “scroungers” | BBC Question Time, 12 June 2014

"My full-time job is actually mental health. I have seen myself, how people have become suicidal. I have had to counsel people who have lost their loved ones who said they did not want to be a burden on their own families because the support has been taken away. These are very, very real issues. And it’s [cuts to benefits] being done in the name of austerity. We’ve had this drive of people being called scroungers when actually half of the people on benefits are pensioners, our pensioners in this country are not scroungers. 60% of people on benefits are in work, but the wages are not paying enough to feed their families.

Yet I’m sitting next to Iain Duncan Smith, who quite happily labels poor people as scroungers, when you claim £39 for a breakfast, like you can’t afford your own breakfast, when you live on your wife’s estate, and have taken £1.5 million of taxpayers money. That’s what I call scroungers, that’s what I call shirkers.”

So glad that Yaqoob said this. Like so many, I’ve been disgusted by the vilification of poor people under the current British government, and the political impunity the Lib/Cons have enjoyed as they wage their war on the British welfare system and the people it used to assist. Lord knows, back in 2012 that was basically all my tumblr was about

I’m elated that Yaqoob says what she came to say despite being interrupted by three different white men in under two minutes. See how they flail about trying to shut her down? Trying, and failing to close ranks. Their language intends to belittle her intelligence, accuracy and question her political maturity. “What a lot of nonsense” says Iain Duncan Smith again and again, as she backs him into a corner. The dimwit David Dimbleby, whose sole public function is to maintain the status quo, (in a very gentlemanly fashion) orders Yaqoob to answer the question. Surely a person with his journalistic experience knows that politicians reframe the question they’re asked and give the answer they came to give? It’s alright when white men with party backing/influence/money do this very thing, but apparently not when Yaqoob does. I’m sure the question was boring anyway. 

But she doesn’t let them to dismiss her! I cannot count the number of times I’ve been talked over and talked down to by white British men. My statements informed by education, research or experience are interrogated, picked apart, evengoogled when similar statements by a white man would be accepted as truths. Apparently, women of colour’s speech is always awaiting verification. I love that Yaqoob refused to succumb to all those familiar silencing tactics, and so quickly articulated a powerful case against austerity.  

dynamicafrica:

Trailer for Spoek Mathambo’s upcoming ‘Future Sound of Mzansi’ documentary.

From Kwaito house and township funk, to Shangaan electro and
sghubu sapitori, South Africa has fast become home to a burgeoning and ever-growing culture of various inter-related strands of homegrown electronic music.

South African jack of many creative trades Spoek Mathambo is now using film to document the musical and cultural history, as well as the present state, of all these various genres of music in the country.

"We traveled around South Africa to explore our rich electronic music scene. For years there’s been a strong movement of producers, instrumentalists, vocalists and most importantly, party goers, giving themselves to new ideas of African electronic music…Our mission was simple, to meet up with some of our heroes, colleagues, competition, and co-conspirators…an ever potent gang of electronic music pioneers sculpting The Future Sound of Mzansi.”

uslonelylondoners:

QUEENIES FADES & BLUNTS. BROOKLYN. SUMMER 2014.

We’re moving to NYC for the summer and our family is growing.

QFB* is a multi-platform project focused on queering barbershops, hair salons and other beauty spaces. This project will address the abstract ideas of beautification and how that process is experienced socially, culturally and politically. 

This is a collaborative effort between The Lonely Londoners, Quilombo, Mo Juicy, Papi Juice, Elvin Tavarez and Khaleb Brooks. Born out of our desire to participate in an international exchange between POC creatives/artists. We were lucky to connect with others who are progressive and inclusive culture producers. By sharing our understandings and ideas an organic partnership was formed.

submissions, requests and ideas are open to all!

email lonelylondoners@gmail.com

tionam:

hair was always laid and them pearls on deck.

RIP to the great Dr. Maya Angelou

(Source: christel-thoughts, via basedandbiased)

ushistoryminuswhiteguys:

Lucy Hicks Anderson was a pioneer in the fight for marriage equality. She spent nearly sixty years living as a woman, doing domestic work, and working as a madam. During the last decade of her life, she made history by fighting for the legal right to be herself with the man she loved.

After marrying her second husband, soldier Reuben Anderson, in Oxnard, California, in 1944, local authorities discovered that she was assigned male at birth. The couple was charged with perjury for marrying despite their both being legally male, resulting in ten years of probation. Standing up to the charges against her, Anderson said, “I defy any doctor in the world to prove that I am not a woman. I have lived, dressed, acted just what I am, a woman.” Years later, Anderson and her husband were charged again, this time with fraud after she received federal money reserved for military spouses. Both went to prison and were banned from Oxnard upon their release.

Lucy Hicks Anderson spent the remainder of her life in Los Angeles until her death in 1954, at age 68, leaving behind a legacy of authenticity and determination in the face of unjust laws.


5 Black Trans Women who Paved the Way — Massachusetts Transgender Political Coalition

(via howtobeafuckinglady)

tobia:

If you haven’t seen it, this marks the final week to view #BLACKEYE at 57 Walker Street in TriBeCa, NYC, which ends May 24th. Hope you all can make it out to see this extraordinary show. (www.blackeyeart.com)

tobia:

If you haven’t seen it, this marks the final week to view #BLACKEYE at 57 Walker Street in TriBeCa, NYC, which ends May 24th. Hope you all can make it out to see this extraordinary show. (www.blackeyeart.com)

(via crankyskirt)

thefutureweird:

THE FUTURE WEIRD: (non-)resident aliens

On Wednesday 21st May, The Future Weird returns with [NON-]RESIDENT ALIENS, an evening of short films about migration, borders, gentrification and contested space. Remembering so-called “black sites”– where government projects are conducted outside of a country’s territory – and isolated immigrant detention centers, we invite you to consider the kind of landscapes we protect, the people we eliminate, and the shocking logic of labour without bodies.

NON-RESIDENT ALIENS presents curated clips & shorts,photography by Richard Mosse & Ingrid Pollard and a dystopic coming-of-age Brazilian TV drama set in a starkly unequal future. 

Join us on Wednesday 21st May 2014 @8PM, at Spectacle Theater for the fifth edition of The Future Weird

» RSVP «

I interviewed Biyi Bandele, director of the Half of a Yellow Sun movie.
We spent two hours speaking about the choices he made as he was adapting, casting and shooting HOAYS, and more broadly about film, representation and industry gatekeepers. I have some criticisms of the film (which I include in the piece) but I wanted to post this quote which I eventually omitted from the interview, in which Bandele eloquently describes the alienation and horror of watching white directors’ representations of Africans:

"I mean, one of the things that inspired me to make movies was this experience that happened over and over. We’d watch movies made about Africans and want to crawl under the seat because you felt dehumanised, you felt disrespected, you felt silenced, you felt muted, you felt disenfranchised, because someone who really didn’t see you as a human being seemed to be the only person who was allowed to tell your story, and if you tried to tell it yourself they tried to shoot you down. It’s precisely because of people like that that I decided we need to tell our own stories, we really need to." 

I interviewed Biyi Bandele, director of the Half of a Yellow Sun movie.

We spent two hours speaking about the choices he made as he was adapting, casting and shooting HOAYS, and more broadly about film, representation and industry gatekeepers. I have some criticisms of the film (which I include in the piece) but I wanted to post this quote which I eventually omitted from the interview, in which Bandele eloquently describes the alienation and horror of watching white directors’ representations of Africans:

"I mean, one of the things that inspired me to make movies was this experience that happened over and over. We’d watch movies made about Africans and want to crawl under the seat because you felt dehumanised, you felt disrespected, you felt silenced, you felt muted, you felt disenfranchised, because someone who really didn’t see you as a human being seemed to be the only person who was allowed to tell your story, and if you tried to tell it yourself they tried to shoot you down. It’s precisely because of people like that that I decided we need to tell our own stories, we really need to." 

qualr:

Juliana Huxtable brings us yet another voguetastic mix starring Nicki Minaj, LE1F and others. If you don’t know about Juliana Huxtable, this will be a great introduction for you to get informed on Her Majesty.

Qualr rates the mix 10/10.

afrocentrico:

prayer by hammond robin

afrocentrico:

prayer by hammond robin

(via lagosphotos)

PROUD FLESH INTER/VIEWS: SYLVIA WYNTER →

derica:

And then more and more, examining myself, examining in my own instinctive reactions to value and so on, there is no way in which I can avoid the fact that I am born into a world in which everything Black has been negatively marked; and everything white has been positively marked. Although I can re-think myself, there are reflex valuations that I continually carry. I suddenly began to see what DuBois was trying to get at and what Fanon was going to get at with Black “self-alienation,” which is that “I have a consciousness that does not function for my best interest!” THERE HAS TO BE A WAR AGAINST “CONSCIOUSNESS.” BLACK STUDIES WAS A WAR! Against what Larry Neal called “the white thing within us”

- in “The Black Arts Movement,” from Addison Gayle, Jr.’s The Black Aesthetic (1971)

(Source: hystericalblackness:)